Action Needed to Reduce the Cost of a Dental Education
Among the hardest hit by the exploding cost of higher education in the U.S. are dental students due to extraordinary costs associated with their training. These rising costs aren't just tough on the graduating dentist, they pose a significant threat to oral health access as well. According to the American Dental Education Association (ADEA), the average dentist now graduates with over $219k in student loan debt - a burden which weighs heavily on one's ability to choose a preferred career path.

Adding to the problem is the fact that dental school tuition has nearly doubled since 2000. With costs continuing to rise each year, timely action is needed to protect the next generation of dentists from being inhibited by staggering amounts of debt. The future status of our country's oral health depends on it. 

Together we can protect future dentists from limited career options brought on by heavy student debt. We can do this by promoting common sense reforms like those found in H.R. 1614, the Student Loan Refinancing Act, legislation that would allow new dentists to refinance their federal student loans any time a lower interest is available. Most dental students rely on federal student loans to finance their dental education. In 2016, nearly 70% of graduating dental students reported using Federal Direct Loans to pay for dental school. Refinanced rates would be fixed, which protects borrowers from interest rate hikes should economic conditions worsen. 

Don't delay - contact your Representative and ask them to cosponsor H.R. 1614 today!
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